Tag Archives: Military Junta

Protesters Shot in Guinea

58 people are dead after security forces fired on protesters in the African nation of Guinea today. They were protesting the current military government (which took power last December) and the expected announcement that the military leader currently in charge, Moussa Dadis Camara, will run in national elections in January 2010. Leaders of the opposition were also arrested at the rally, Al Jazeera.

China is preparing a massive celebration for October 1, the 60th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China. Photo gallery of the preparations, CNN. A CNN reporter, Emily Chang, was granted permission to interview members of  the Communist Youth League in advance of the anniversary, CNN International. Tour of Mao’s hometown, CNN Asia.

The Oxfam international aid agency has issued an emergency call for aid to Ethiopia and other East African countries. The area is experiencing the worst drought in 10 years, BBC News.

A new study says that most corporations aren’t paying taxes in the United States:

The Government Accountability Office said 72 percent of all foreign corporations and about 57 percent of U.S. companies doing business in the United States paid no federal income taxes for at least one year between 1998 and 2000.

Senators Byron Dorgan and Carl Levin requested the study so that the U.S. government can work to plug holes in the tax code, Reuters. The process companies use to avoid paying taxes is illustrated in the 2007 film Michael Clayton, IMDB.

The publication date of the memoirs of former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin has been moved up from next spring to November 17 of this year. The book will be called “Going Rogue,” Associated Press.

Leave a comment

Filed under Evening Edition

Looking Forward: Elections in Myanmar

Myanmar, a country in southeast Asia formerly called Burma before it was renamed by the military junta that currently control it, plans to hold elections in 2010. The last elections were held in 1990 when pro-democracy activist Aung San Suu Kyi won most of the vote but was not allowed by the military to take power. Suu Kyi has been held under house arrest for much of the time since then. Myanmar is a severely repressed state where citizens are not even allowed to stay the night in other people’s houses. This is the technicality that led to Aung San Suu Kyi’s house arrest being extended when an American man who believed he was sent by God swam across a lake to Suu Kyi’s house and then, claiming illness, stayed overnight. Sanctions have been imposed against Myanmar, meaning that it is illegal for Western businesses to sell goods to the country, The New American.

The upcoming  elections are an attempt to legitimize the government in hopes of one day having the sanctions lifted and being accepted in the global community.  However, at least one fourth of the seats will go to members of the military and democratic activists like Aung San Suu Kyi will not be able to participate. Reuters Q & A on the elections. Comprehensive analysis of the impact of elections by the International Crisis Group.

Leave a comment

Filed under Featured